ESTONIA-EU-ECONOMY-EUROZONE-CURRENCY-FOREX-EURO : News Photo

ESTONIA-EU-ECONOMY-EUROZONE-CURRENCY-FOREX-EURO

Credit: RAIGO PAJULA / Stringer
A Estonian cashier puts Estonian crowns and euro notes in a cash desk in a supermarket in Tallinn on January 1, 2011. Estonia adopted the European single currency at midnight, ringing in 2011 as the 17th member of the eurozone, a bloc threatened by bailouts in Greece and Ireland and debt woes in Portugal and Spain. As a spectacular fireworks show lit up the sky over Tallinn, the 2004 Baltic EU entrant of 1.3 million which broke free from the crumbling Soviet Union in 1991 bade a reluctant farewell to its kroon, adopted in 1992 to replace the Soviet ruble. While the centre-right government of Prime Minister Andrus Ansip has championed the switch to the euro as economic good sense despite the eurozone's turmoil, replacing Estonia's highly symbolic kroon has received a muted welcome among average Estonians. = ESTONIA OUT = (Photo credit should read RAIGO PAJULA/AFP/GettyImages)
Caption:
A Estonian cashier puts Estonian crowns and euro notes in a cash desk in a supermarket in Tallinn on January 1, 2011. Estonia adopted the European single currency at midnight, ringing in 2011 as the 17th member of the eurozone, a bloc threatened by bailouts in Greece and Ireland and debt woes in Portugal and Spain. As a spectacular fireworks show lit up the sky over Tallinn, the 2004 Baltic EU entrant of 1.3 million which broke free from the crumbling Soviet Union in 1991 bade a reluctant farewell to its kroon, adopted in 1992 to replace the Soviet ruble. While the centre-right government of Prime Minister Andrus Ansip has championed the switch to the euro as economic good sense despite the eurozone's turmoil, replacing Estonia's highly symbolic kroon has received a muted welcome among average Estonians. = ESTONIA OUT = (Photo credit should read RAIGO PAJULA/AFP/GettyImages)
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Date created:
January 01, 2011
Editorial #:
153654852
Release info:
Not released.More information
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses. Full editorial rights UK, US, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Canada (not Quebec). Restricted editorial rights elsewhere, please call local office.= ESTONIA OUT =
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
AFP
Credit:
AFP/Getty Images
Max file size:
4,256 x 2,832 px (59.11 x 39.33 in) - 72 dpi - 3.38 MB
Source:
AFP
Barcode:
AFP
Object name:
Par3687394

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A Estonian cashier puts Estonian crowns and euro notes in a cash desk... News Photo 153654852Cash Register,Cashier,Close-up,Crown,Customer,Desk,Estonia,Europe,European Currency,European Union,European Union Currency,Government,Horizontal,Illustration,Illustration Technique,Moving Activity,Note,Politics,Supermarket,TallinnPhotographer Collection: AFP 2012 AFPA Estonian cashier puts Estonian crowns and euro notes in a cash desk in a supermarket in Tallinn on January 1, 2011. Estonia adopted the European single currency at midnight, ringing in 2011 as the 17th member of the eurozone, a bloc threatened by bailouts in Greece and Ireland and debt woes in Portugal and Spain. As a spectacular fireworks show lit up the sky over Tallinn, the 2004 Baltic EU entrant of 1.3 million which broke free from the crumbling Soviet Union in 1991 bade a reluctant farewell to its kroon, adopted in 1992 to replace the Soviet ruble. While the centre-right government of Prime Minister Andrus Ansip has championed the switch to the euro as economic good sense despite the eurozone's turmoil, replacing Estonia's highly symbolic kroon has received a muted welcome among average Estonians. = ESTONIA OUT = (Photo credit should read RAIGO PAJULA/AFP/GettyImages)