Gulf Oil Spill Spreads, Damaging Economies, Nature, And Way Of Life : News Photo

Gulf Oil Spill Spreads, Damaging Economies, Nature, And Way Of Life

Credit: 
Spencer Platt / Staff
GRAND ISLE, LA - JUNE 14: Contract clean-up workers remove oil from the sands of Queen Bess Island, home to a number of bird species June 14, 2010 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, some 1,282 oiled birds have been captured in time to be treated with the intention of eventually releasing them back into the wild. The BP spill has been called the largest environmental disaster in American history. U.S. government scientists have estimated that the flow rate of oil gushing out of a ruptured Gulf of Mexico oil well may be as high 40,000 barrels per day. President Obama will make his fourth trip to the Gulf on Monday. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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GRAND ISLE, LA - JUNE 14: Contract clean-up workers remove oil from the sands of Queen Bess Island, home to a number of bird species June 14, 2010 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, some 1,282 oiled birds have been captured in time to be treated with the intention of eventually releasing them back into the wild. The BP spill has been called the largest environmental disaster in American history. U.S. government scientists have estimated that the flow rate of oil gushing out of a ruptured Gulf of Mexico oil well may be as high 40,000 barrels per day. President Obama will make his fourth trip to the Gulf on Monday. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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Date created:
June 14, 2010
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102081361
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Contract cleanup workers remove oil from the sands of Queen Bess... News Photo 102081361Army,BP,Bird,British Culture,Cleanup,Contract,Crisis,Emergencies and Disasters,Environment,Environmental Issues,Fish,Fossil Fuel,Fuel and Power Generation,Gas,Gulf,Home,Horizontal,Industry,Louisiana,Nature,Number,Occupation,Oil,Oil Spill,Pollution,Removing,Sand,Sea,Sea Life,Species,USA,Water,Water PollutionPhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 2010 Getty ImagesGRAND ISLE, LA - JUNE 14: Contract clean-up workers remove oil from the sands of Queen Bess Island, home to a number of bird species June 14, 2010 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, some 1,282 oiled birds have been captured in time to be treated with the intention of eventually releasing them back into the wild. The BP spill has been called the largest environmental disaster in American history. U.S. government scientists have estimated that the flow rate of oil gushing out of a ruptured Gulf of Mexico oil well may be as high 40,000 barrels per day. President Obama will make his fourth trip to the Gulf on Monday. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)